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Tag: parents

Overnight camping!


This coming weekend I get to go on an overnight camp-out with other boys and their dads from our church.  We’re going to set up tents by a lake and cook our food on an open fire.  Andy’s begging me to go along, but I’m not sure how the other boys would react if they knew an ant had joined the camping overnight.  I’ve seen some boys squash ants for no reason at all, and I know Andy wouldn’t like that!  Andy said his Uncle Andrew could go camping with him.  I will have to think about this.  Many people don’t like ants.  They don’t realize how much you can learn from the littlest of things.



It is time for community involvement!

Look for opportunities to do something with your child that results in helping others.  If your child is old enough to be in school you can find meaningful ways to do things together that result in others being touched.


Be creative but be intentional so that your child’s experiences are teaching moments. There are many needs to be met and each experience can teach something different.  Help clean up a park, volunteer to work in a soup kitchen, serve a meal to senior citizens, attend a civic meeting, visit an animal shelter, volunteer time to help an elderly person by washing windows, pulling weeds, cleaning out a storage shed, etc.  The goal is to work with your child to meet a need.


Praise your child to others, in front of your child.

The next time you are out with friends and your son or daughter are with you, express how proud you are of something that your child recently accomplished or did.  Brag just a bit so your son or daughter hears you telling someone else.   Your child needs to hear you telling others of his/her character or achievement.  Going public like this affirms just how proud you are of your child.  At least once a week make it a goal to speak praise about your child.  Your child need to know you are proud of him/her.


No excuses! Your child’s behavior is a reflection on your parental leadership.

Caring parents take responsibility for the results of their child’s behavior.  For many parents this is a challenge. Life is busy and often kids end up with the left-overs.  It is often easier to offer an excuse or blame someone else or something else for a child’s behavior.  Effective parents realize that failure or success is due to their capability to lead correctly and take responsibility as a parent.


Write it, don’t just say it!

Verbally expressing a compliment is important but writing a compliment down and giving it to a child is much more powerful. Here is a suggestion.  Each week write a short one or two sentence note of praise to your child on a full-size sheet of paper.   Write at his or her level so it is meaningful to them. Praise your child for something he or she did or a characteristic that is noteworthy.  Create some art on the page!  If you do one written compliment a week you child will have 52 positive affirmations in writing in just a year.   This is the beginning of your legacy to your child.