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Category: Parent’s Tips

Make-believe is fun. Join in the adventure!

Embrace your child’s make-believe friends. After all, you also had your make-believe friends when you were his or her age. Join in the adventures your child creates. It is okay to be a kid and “play along” with their world. Don’t just tell them to go play—engage in the game with them. Join them in making up new adventures and situations. Enjoy a tea party or a battle with robots. A few minutes living where your child lives will do you both a lot of good. This builds their confidence and creative thinking skills and gives you a wonderful break from the realities of life you are facing.

Use bedtime to probe into your child’s mind. 

When it is time for bed, try lying down next to your child, holding their hand, and asking them about their day. Listen to what is on their mind. Probe to bring out the good things they have experienced. Listen for what is bothering them or causing them fear. Give your child at least five minutes a day when they are doing the talking and you are doing the listening. After this discussion, close by praying for your child and help him relate to God who cares for his or her concern.

Pause, hold a hand—and pray.

After the lights are out and the conversation is over, don’t leave your child for a few minutes. Keep holding your child’s hand. Allow them to fall asleep knowing you are there as their parent and protector. You really don’t have something more important to do. As a parent, your first priority is to ensure that your child knows you care and that you are there as their protector. Building this confidence as they drift off to sleep goes a long way when you need to make corrections later!

Finish each day in the dark!

The Andy Ant adventure stories were started in my young daughter’s dark bedroom when she was about ready to go to sleep. How can you use this time to instill values, teach lessons of life, reinforce right behavior, or just have a fun bonding experience that ends up lasting a lifetime? You might think that these quiet moments are not very important; but to your child, ten minutes in the dark could be the highlight of their day—if you are really connecting with your little one.

Tell your child stories with an applied lesson.

Reading stories to your child is wonderful and encouraging, but making up stories that relate to your child’s life is even better. To help you do this, each of story in Andy’s Adventures provides you the setting and content for a new story adventure followed by a few questions that allow you and your child to complete the adventure. There is no right conclusion. Allow your imaginations to have some fun. The story can end any way you and your child want. Always try to end a story by relating back to your child’s day. There is always a lesson to be learned. Learning life lessons through fun adventures makes a lasting impression.