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Tag: tips

Write it, don’t just say it!

Verbally expressing a compliment is important but writing a compliment down and giving it to a child is much more powerful. Here is a suggestion.  Each week write a short one or two sentence note of praise to your child on a full-size sheet of paper.   Write at his or her level so it is meaningful to them. Praise your child for something he or she did or a characteristic that is noteworthy.  Create some art on the page!  If you do one written compliment a week you child will have 52 positive affirmations in writing in just a year.   This is the beginning of your legacy to your child.

Have you complemented your child in writing this week?

My grandson’s first grade teacher prepared a year-end gift for each child in her class:  A personalized compliment book.  Every child in class was instructed to write a sentence or two on a piece of paper expressing a good quality of each classmate. They added illustrative art typical of a first grader. The teacher then combined all the papers for each child and created a personalized book of compliments for each one.  The introductory page was to each child, expressing hopes and dreams and how glad the teacher was for getting to know each child. Each page expresses something special.  The best is affirmed.  Every page makes a lasting impression

Ponder the implications of your role!

Your ability to lead as a parent has a direct impact on the results you want to achieve in your children.  What are you doing today to insure the outcome you want to see realized? Effective parenting requires quality time AND quantity time.  The more time you spend with your child the more progress you will see toward the outcome you want.  Your child deserves TIME with you!

 

Kids Need Your Undivided Attention!

Yes, life is busy.  Most of us feel we need to multitask just to survive.  I watched a father the other day spend some “quality time” at a park with a young son about eight years old. Sadly, the dad was not engaging his son.  He was physically there but he was many miles away emotionally and mentally.  The entire time they were together for “quality time” he was talking on his phone, texting, or playing on his phone.  His young son was off playing by himself without even a friend to help occupy his time.

 

Your kids need you!  They need you to ask questions and to listen, play on the floor, hike a hill, or talk about life issues that are important to the child.  Do your child a favor.  When you set aside time for your child turn off your distractions.  Do what is important to your child, not what is important to you.

 

Is your child teaching you something?

Your child is capable of coming up with surprising insight.  Be listening, because your child is likely going to be teaching you a thing or two, regardless of age.

When my oldest grandson was about 2 ½ he was strapped into his car seat.  He had no idea where he was or where his parents were taking him.  All he could see was the world passing by.  Mom and dad were in a serious conversation. There was a moment of silence between the two of them.  My grandson was not involved in the adult conversation.  Suddenly, out of the blue, he spoke out as clear as can be and said, “It is just a jungle out there!”  Amazing insights can come from kids if you as a parent are just listening.