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Tag: advise

Leadership ability often shows up early in a child’s life.

Leadership skills don’t come out of a kid without encouragement from those that see it! Achieving leadership skills is a journey that involves you as a parent.  Not every kid will be like Thomas Jefferson, but every child has an abundance of potential for greatness.  As a parent, find ways to allow your child to lead.  Allow him to plan a special event. Allow her to do something that is out of her comfort zone.  Allow experimentation.  Embrace the outcome.  Be your kid’s cheerleader.  Allow them to fail.

At its core, leadership development is almost always a matter of identifying one’s potential and then nurturing that potential so that the individual enjoys the personal adventure of discovery.   Imagine for a moment that you were the parents of Thomas Jefferson.  What did you see in him that would lead you to intentionally make sacrifices and created an environment for him to eventually do the unthinkable?

Assigned to Mow the Lawn!

Dad assigned me a new job this morning.  He thinks I am now old enough to mow the lawn with the power mower.  This means more work for me.  I don’t like this growing up stuff—I wish I could be Peter Pan.  Anyway, Dad showed me how to start the mower and how to go back and forth over the lawn.  After making a few passes with me he turned the mover over to me.  Wow, I was running the mower as good as Dad was.  Back and forth I went until the front law was done.

As I mowed I remember the day Dad decided to mow the law after I had told Andy and his soccer team they could practice on the lawn.  That day the lawnmower just about mowed down the whole ant soccer team.  You need to read the Lawnmower on the Loose book to see what happened that day. You can be assured, there were no ants out playing in the grass today. When I learned that Dad was going to train me to mow the lawn I ran to the front porch and warned Andy to get his friends away from the grass.  I did not want another disaster

 

Do you see your child as a promise and a possibility?

Your child is full of exceptional potential.  Your child was created for a purpose.  It is your responsibility to identify the likely strengths of your child and then take the steps that help him/her become all that God intended.   To reach one’s potential is a journey that involves you as a parent, your child’s teachers, grandparents, and mentors. Your child has an abundance of potential for greatness, but you need to ensure it all comes out!  Greatness does not come in a magic pill.  Greatness is the result of hard work.  Character development is your responsibility. What your child sees and reads, the relationships he develops, and the habits he/she acquires is the foundation to becoming what she was intended to be.

I’m on restriction!

I am on restriction for some dumb thing I did this last weekend. I am usually a good kid but what I did to by sister, Becky, was not a good thing.  I really don’t want to talk about what I did. Restriction means I cannot leave my property today—including going to swimming lessons.  Bummer.   I decided to see what Andy was up to.  He wasn’t at home and I found him at his swimming hole.  I encouraged him to swim while I watched—even though his Dad told him to never swim alone.  What happened next was a disaster!  What a problem I created for Andy.  You need to get the Swimming Hole Disaster book to see what happened to Andy because I forgot to do what I said I would do.  This has not been a good day!

Encourage imagination! 

Encourage your children to use their imagination. Allow their little minds to dream big dreams. When you hear about an imaginary friend engage your child by asking questions about this new friend.  This is all a part of growing up.  Find ways to teach life lessons by relating to these friends that you cannot see.  Don’t discourage your child.  Knowing you are interested in her thoughts gives her confidence that you care.  The Andy Ant stories are based on a child’s relationship with his best friend—in this case a little ant that lives under the front steps of his house.  Where does your child’s imaginary friend live?  How much do you know about this special friend?