Twitter response:

Category: Parent’s Tips

Ponder the implications of your role!

Your ability to lead as a parent has a direct impact on the results you want to achieve in your children.  What are you doing today to insure the outcome you want to see realized? Effective parenting requires quality time AND quantity time.  The more time you spend with your child the more progress you will see toward the outcome you want.  Your child deserves TIME with you!

 

Kids Need Your Undivided Attention!

Yes, life is busy.  Most of us feel we need to multitask just to survive.  I watched a father the other day spend some “quality time” at a park with a young son about eight years old. Sadly, the dad was not engaging his son.  He was physically there but he was many miles away emotionally and mentally.  The entire time they were together for “quality time” he was talking on his phone, texting, or playing on his phone.  His young son was off playing by himself without even a friend to help occupy his time.

 

Your kids need you!  They need you to ask questions and to listen, play on the floor, hike a hill, or talk about life issues that are important to the child.  Do your child a favor.  When you set aside time for your child turn off your distractions.  Do what is important to your child, not what is important to you.

 

Is your child teaching you something?

Your child is capable of coming up with surprising insight.  Be listening, because your child is likely going to be teaching you a thing or two, regardless of age.

When my oldest grandson was about 2 ½ he was strapped into his car seat.  He had no idea where he was or where his parents were taking him.  All he could see was the world passing by.  Mom and dad were in a serious conversation. There was a moment of silence between the two of them.  My grandson was not involved in the adult conversation.  Suddenly, out of the blue, he spoke out as clear as can be and said, “It is just a jungle out there!”  Amazing insights can come from kids if you as a parent are just listening.

Want vs Need

Language has implications.  What you say to a child has lasting impact.  Choose your words carefully so you can truly engage with the thinking of your child.  Here is an example:  Are you guilty of asking your child what he or she wants?  Asking about wants reinforces “me” thinking.  Rather, ask your child what he or she needs.  This question helps you and the child center on a need that you can help fill by working together.  Check yourself and see if you are by default reinforcing self-centered mindset.  It is OK to ask for occasional wants—but be sure that they are questions related to a special occasion or a long-term goal.

Leadership ability often shows up early in a child’s life.

Leadership skills don’t come out of a kid without encouragement from those that see it! Achieving leadership skills is a journey that involves you as a parent.  Not every kid will be like Thomas Jefferson, but every child has an abundance of potential for greatness.  As a parent, find ways to allow your child to lead.  Allow him to plan a special event. Allow her to do something that is out of her comfort zone.  Allow experimentation.  Embrace the outcome.  Be your kid’s cheerleader.  Allow them to fail.

At its core, leadership development is almost always a matter of identifying one’s potential and then nurturing that potential so that the individual enjoys the personal adventure of discovery.   Imagine for a moment that you were the parents of Thomas Jefferson.  What did you see in him that would lead you to intentionally make sacrifices and created an environment for him to eventually do the unthinkable?