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Category: Parent’s Tips

Five back to school tips for parents
Five back to school tips for parents

I’m here with five tips for life in all its beautiful feelings when you say goodbye to those kids, whether it be to kindergarten or the third year of college. A larger perspective spreads out before you at the end. Whether those kids are going on a bus, driving themselves to high school, or headed right back into your living room to go to school—remember these things.

    1. Feel however you feel. Elated? Terrified? Sorrowful? Like turning cartwheels and drinking wine right there in the middle of the morning? Whatever, guys. All of those feelings might be cycled through in one hour. It’s OK. Feel them. Don’t feel like you’re “supposed” to feel. We all react differently, and it is no measure of our love for our offspring. No comparisons, no condemnation.
    2. Treasure the firsts and lasts. Don’t wait until senior year of high school to realize you will never have another first day of school, another last packed lunch (hallelujah!), or another Christmas concert. Treasure them all as they happen. I know—at times you will want to eat your own toenails more than you will want to attend another two-hour concert sitting on bleachers. But trust me, treasure it. It will be over. Enjoy the firsts and lasts, big and small, as they happen.

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Teaching Children About God – What Works Best
Teaching Children About God – What Works Best

“These words that I am commanding you today must prove to be on your heart; and you must inculcate them in your son and speak of them when you sit in your house and when you walk on the road and when you lie down and when you get up.”​—DEUTERONOMY 6:6, 7.

PARENTS may at times feel overwhelmed by the responsibility of training their children. When they seek advice, however, the sheer volume of counsel on the subject may swamp them further. Relatives and friends are often keen to pass on their suggestions. And books, magazine articles, and Internet sites offer parents a constant stream of sometimes conflicting advice.

The Bible, on the other hand, provides parents not only reliable counsel on what to teach their children but also practical direction on how to teach them. As the Bible verses quoted above indicate, parents need to find some way each day to talk about God to their children. Discussed below are just four Bible-based suggestions that have helped thousands of parents to teach their children about God.

1. Draw lessons from creation. The apostle Paul wrote: “[God’s] invisible qualities are clearly seen from the world’s creation onward, because they are perceived by the things made, even his eternal power and Godship.” (Romans 1:20) Parents can do much to help their children see God as a real Person by drawing attention to God’s creative works and then helping their children discern what qualities of God those creations reveal. (more…)

Do you what your child to respect and honor the Creator of life? 

If you want your child to be God-honoring, it is important that you bring God into conversations with your child on a regular basis.  For your child to grow to respect the Creator, you need to be acknowledging the Creator. Find a creative way three to four times a day to bring God into your conversations with your child.   If you don’t, who will be doing this?

When you do blow it—and you will.

If you do lose your temper when applying discipline to your child and end up acting like a child yourself, you need to cool down, breath, and then sit down with your child and apologize for your inappropriate behavior.  Your child needs to see you admit wrong when you are wrong.  When your behavior is not appropriate ask your child for forgiveness in handling the situation poorly.  Allow your apology to be a teaching moment for your child.

 

Discipline should be intentional and appropriate.

As a parent, you should discipline in a direct and intentional way that demonstrates to your child that you are in control and that the behavior requiring discipline is not acceptable. When you are “out of control” in giving discipline, your child will very likely ignore the discipline. Your child may be sitting down on the outside, but standing up on the inside. Be the parent, not an adult kid. There is no reason to “lose your temper.”